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  Introduction This article highlights the F5 ARX Disaster Recovery process via the configuration-replication feature (DMOS 5.2 and above) and Big-IP (v10.2.1) Global Traffic Manager (GTM). A new ARX global-config mode option enables as well as facilitates simple Disaster Recovery fail-over of all or part of a file virtualization environment from one ARX cluster to another assuming that files are being replicated using file server replication technology (i.e SnapMirror; VNX Replication; ...
Background EAVs (External Application Verification) monitors are one of most useful and extensible features of the BIG-IP product line. They give the end user the ability to utilize the underlying Linux operating system to perform complex and thorough service checks. Given a service that does not have a monitor provided, a lot of users will assign the closest related monitor and consider the solution complete. There are more than a few cases where a TCP or UDP monitor will mark a service &ldquo...
Whether you're in the IT industry or just using IT in whatever industry you're in, chances are good that most people are using email in the workplace to some extent. Those of us in the IT field rely on it as a mission critical tool that we use to support our business. A larger and larger part of this email use is becoming a mix of internal and external usage. An environment that supports both local clients as well as people logging in remotely to not only check their email and calendar, but to w...
Let's face it, we like to believe that disaster will never happen, but how many times have you accidentally deleted a document you have been working on for a presentation without a working backup?  Odds are more than once.  If it can happen on your desktop, then it can happen on the network and imagine the situation where your network configuration is running the bread and butter for your company.  Wouldn't it be nice to have the knowledge that your network configuration is secure...
articleaccesssecuritynewstechtip March 04, 2008 by Deb Allen
Nathan McMahon and Kirk Bauer bring us another slick solution for a couple of common requirements in high performance environments: To fail over immediately when a single physical network connection loses connectivity, or if the number of active members in a trunk falls below the configured minimum. For example, many customers want to fail over immediately when the egress router-facing interface loses connectivity.  Others have minimum throughput requirements on multi-port trunks and ne...
The main use we see for iControl applications is with the automation of control features such as adding, removing, enabling, and disabling objects.   Another key step in multi-device management is the automation of applying hotfixes and other software updates as well as the downloading of configurations for archival and disaster recovery purposes.  iControl has a set of methods that enable the uploading and downloading of files for these purposes.  This article will discuss t...
By Lori  MacVittie In the increasingly buzzword compliant world of SOA and Web 2.0 it is inevitable that you have, or will, come across three of the industries’ favorite terms: composites, mashups, and processes. These terms represent concepts that while similar actually describe very different uses of services. The distinctions between the three are subtle and in many cases it makes almost no sense to differentiate between them. But one of the goals of SOA is to provide a common ...
If you have machines behind your BIG-IP that are not load balanced, you still get a ton of benefits from their location. Virtualization is a big one, as is the number of metrics that are available in the BIG-IP. This Tech Tip focuses on a simple way to get more out of your BIG-IP by simply putting servers behind it. Yep, we said that. Just put the servers behind the BIG-IP and get more. The idea is simple. Upgrades cost downtime - generally a not insignificant amount of downtime. But what if y...
articleaccesssecuritybig-ipnewstechtip September 21, 2005 by Colin Walker
It’s a commonly used practice these days for web applications to make use of sessions to keep track of a requesting client’s data.  This is done for many reasons, authentication, user privileges, shopping cart contents, etc.  One of the hindrances of this practice is the need for a persistent connection to a single webserver for that client.  Without persistence, you don’t know which server you’ll actually be routed to, assuming you’re accessing an application that’s being serve...